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12 Drug Test

In a few simple steps, the First Check® Home Drug Test provides you with results that are over 99% accurate in the privacy of your home for the possible use of the 7 most commonly-abused illicit drugs and 5 of the most commonly-abused prescription drugs.
7 Illicit Drugs

  • Marijuana
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy
  • Amphetamines
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)

5 Prescription Drugs

  • Tricyclic Antidepressants
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methadone
  • Oxycodone

Product Benefits

  • Over 99% Accurate*
  • Simple cup technology is easy to use and involves no handling of the specimen
  • Results in just 5 minutes
  • Confidential results in the privacy of your own home
  • Free confirmatory mail-in laboratory testing

Download an informative PDF about First Check® Home Drug Tests.

*Clinical studies confirmed the First Check test to be over 99% accurate. We recommend all positive screening results be sent to the laboratory for confirmation via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), the gold standard in laboratory testing for most drugs.

Marijuana

What is it?

Marijuana is the dried leaves and flowers of the hemp (cannabis) plant.

Slang Terms:

Grass, dank, bud, zig zag, hydro, cannabis, bud, smoke, chronic, herb, reefer, pot, weed, ganja, dope, mary jane, skunk

Intoxicated Terms:

High, loaded, baked, roasted, buzzed, or stoned

How is it used?

Dried leaves are hand-rolled into cigarettes called joints or stuffed into hollowed-out cigars called blunts. Marijuana is also smoked in small pipes known as one-hitters or tooters, or in a larger water pipe called a bong.

Smoke is inhaled and held in the lungs as long as possible to maximize effects. Marijuana is also mixed into food and eaten or brewed with hot water into tea.

Sign of usage:

Dilated pupils, a lack of focus or slowed/changed speech.

Use of heavy perfumes or air fresheners to cover the distinctive odor of marijuana smoke.

Effects of usage:

Impaired brain functions resulting in the following:

Marijuana use can result in attention deficit, impaired memory, impaired learning, and difficulty with sensory experiences. Individual may also be unmotivated and experience impaired reaction time, motor skills, and ability to maintain and shift attention.

How long do the effects last?

Effects peak within 20 minutes and last 2-3 hours.

Effects of withdrawal:

Cravings, irritability, insomnia, anxiety

Adverse reactions:

Resembles a panic or anxiety attack.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Respiratory problems, nagging coughs, frequent chest colds, chronic bronchitis, and risk of pneumonia. Long term use can adversely affect the immune system and reproductive system.

Usage by 12th graders:

49% of High School seniors report having tried marijuana

32% of High School seniors report having used marijuana in the past year

22.4% of High School seniors report being current regular users of marijuana

Recent Developments:

Marijuana is being used in combination with other drugs of abuse and is a delivery medium for other drugs. Crack, psilocybin mushrooms, ketamine, and PCP are sometimes added to marijuana joints. Slang names for the combinations vary according to geographic locations around the country. Joints or blunts containing PCP are known as love boats, honey-dipped joints, happy sticks, sherms, or dust blunts. Dipping marijuana joints into other chemicals such as formaldehyde, embalming fluid, or formaldehyde mixed with PCP enhances the effects of marijuana and makes the joints and blunts burn longer. The PCP combination produces aggressive behavior in the users. Variations make marijuana smoking more unpredictable, particularly for novice users.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Cocaine

What is it?

Cocaine is a potent, addictive stimulant that directly affects the brain and central nervous system. This crystal powder is manufactured from the coca leaf. In its pure form, cocaine is a chemical known as cocaine hydrochloride. Crack cocaine is cocaine that has been cooked down with baking soda to form ammonia or sodium bicarbonate that is used by smoking.

Slang Terms:

Nose nachos, racehorse Charlie, yeyo, hooter, crank, blow, bad rock, bazooka, beam, Bernice, big C, blizzard, coca, blast beam, flake, nose candy. Crack is also referred to as freebase, ready rock, and gravel.

Intoxicated Terms:

Buzzed, high, getting a rush, freaked out

How is it used?

Cocaine can be inhaled or snorted through the nose or it can be injected directly into the blood stream. Crack cocaine can be smoked. The drug user uses baking soda with water and a hot flame to cook the cocaine into chunks or “rocks,” which are then broken into pieces that are smoked in a glass pipe. Many users mix other drugs with cocaine or crack to get what they consider a better high. When heroin and cocaine are used together, for example, it results in an immediate high and is also addictive at first time use.

Signs of usage:

There are physical and social signs to watch for in cocaine use. Physical signs include red, bloodshot eyes, runny nose, and frequent sniffling. The user may change eating habits and lose weight. There is often a change in sleeping habits, an increase in skipping school or flunking out of school, a distinct loss of interest in old activities, and a change of friends or groups. The user frequently needs money and will resort to stealing. The user will almost always be withdrawn, listless, and careless about personal appearance.

Effects of usage:

The effects of the drug depend on the way it is taken. The drug reaches the brain within seconds, creating a “rush.” When injected, the euphoric high happens more quickly and with more intensity. When inhaled or smoked, this rush takes place within several minutes. Tolerance is built up with use, so more of the drug has to be taken each time to experience the same effects.

How long do the effects last?

Effects peak within 20 minutes and last 2-3 hours. The high from cocaine lasts up to about 30 minutes and from crack, less than ten minutes. The euphoria makes this drug very addictive.

Effects of withdrawal:

Just as the intense emotional highs resulting from cocaine use are addictive, the lows after use can be devastating. This may depend on intensity of the hit and how the drug was taken. Fatigue and irritability also result. Intense cravings result from use because of the intensity and pleasure of the highs.

Adverse reactions:

Extreme psychological reactions can occur, including paranoia and excitability. The possibility of stroke and heart attack is a reality, especially when cocaine is mixed with another drug or with alcohol.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Cocaine poses risks of both physical and psychological addiction. There are numerous health consequences associated with cocaine use, including cardiac arrest and stroke due to reduction of blood flow to the heart and brain. Memory problems and abdominal problems are also risks. Alcohol and cocaine used together are a deadly combination and can cause sudden death. Snorting cocaine can actually rot teeth, damage nasal passages, and at the very least, cause nasal congestion. Lung problems and chest pain can result from smoking crack.

Use by age:

The average age of first use for cocaine is reported to be 19.5 years, and the most prevalent use by age is in young adults aged 18-25. However, the average age of those who finally receive treatment is mid-30’s.

Use by grade level:

1.2 % of eighth-graders
1.3 % of tenth-graders
2.1% of high school seniors
While cocaine users tend to be young, cocaine use is becoming more common by those who originally used it in their youth and are now in their 50s and older.

Recent Developments:

Cocaine use peaked in the 1970s and again in the mid- 1980s and 1990s. Though there is a reported decreased use with youth today, cocaine is a powerfully addictive drug with extremely dangerous health risks. Overall, young women are now using more crack than young men.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Opiates

What is it?

An opiate is a drug derived from the opium plant. The main opiates are morphine, codeine, and heroin. Opiates are also referred to as narcotics. Narcotic addicts, when faced with shortages in their supply, often substitute various narcotic drugs for others. Heroin is the most widely-abused illicit narcotic in the U.S.

Slang Terms:

Smack, morphine, courage pills, brown sugar, black tar, H, junk, horse, gunpowder, hard candy,  bomb, chiva, mud, noise, dope, skag, China White.

Intoxicated Terms:

Being under the influence of heroin is referred to as being “on the nod.”

How is it used?

Heroin can be injected intravenously, intramuscularly, or just beneath the skin (subcutaneously). It may also be snorted or smoked.

Sign of usage:

The user displays droopy eyelids, constricted pupils, and sluggish, delayed speech and mannerisms. The opiate user will appear very drowsy and have difficulty with mental functioning and attention span. If the user administers the drug with an injection, there will be needle marks and possible signs of infection at injection sites.

Effects of usage:

The short-term effects of heroin abuse appear soon after a single dose and disappear in a few hours. After an injection of heroin, the user experiences a feeling of euphoria (“rush”) accompanied by a warm flushing of the skin, a dry mouth, and heavy extremities.

How long do the effects last?

Heroin’s effects appear almost immediately after its use if injected intravenously and last for several hours. If injected intramuscularly, a rush will be produced within five to eight minutes, and the effects of sniffing can be felt within ten to fifteen minutes.

Effects of withdrawal:

Withdrawal, which in regular abusers may occur as early as a few hours after the last dose, produces drug craving, restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps, and kicking movements. Major withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 and 72 hours after the last dose and subside after about a week.

Adverse reactions:

Heroin purity varies greatly, a fact that makes heroin use that much more dangerous. Too much pure heroin can result in respiratory arrest and death. For those users with already compromised physical health, respiratory complications can result due to the drug’s depressing effects on respiration.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Chronic users may develop collapsed veins, infection of the heart lining and valves, abscesses, cellulitis, and liver disease.

Usage by youth:

Among students heroin use is low when compared with other drugs of abuse. Current reported use of heroin is less than 1% by high school students. The average age for the first time heroin user is 19.8 years.

Recent Developments:

With the advent of HIV and Hepatitis preferred administration of heroin has changed from injection to snorting and smoking. Squirting or dripping heroin that has been dissolved in water up the nose from a small plastic bottle is called shebanging and is gaining in popularity. Combining heroin with other illicit drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy in capsules has also increased accessibility of the drug and a new nightclub crowd of users.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Methamphetamine

What is it?

Methamphetamine or Meth is a powerful addictive stimulant that is similar to adrenaline, and dramatically affects the central nervous system. The fact that it is widely manufactured from inexpensive ingredients in simple labs, often homebased, contributes to its widespread use. Toxic ingredients such as battery acid and drain cleaner are also used to produce meth.

Slang Terms:

Meth, crank, crystal, speed, ice and glass. Use is often referred to as “doing a line.” Binging is “doing a run.”

How is it used?

Methamphetamine is a white or colored powder that can be taken intravenously, smoked, snorted through the nose, or made into pill form and swallowed. Smokeable methamphetamine is known as glass or ice.

Signs of usage:

When under the influence of meth, the user may be very talkative with a high level of energy. Dry mouth can be observed, as well as dilated pupils. Users may also scratch at imaginary bugs on the face and other skin, leaving sores. Weight loss can be observed after a period of use.

Effects of usage:

At first the user feels energized, focused, positive, and alert. Many people take the drug to stay awake and active. However, the first “high” is usually not attained again with the same dose, so more meth is taken the next time. Many teenage girls and young women take meth to lose weight, which seems easy because of loss of appetite. Insomnia, sweating, and repeated motor activity are common effects as well as some alarming psychological and physical effects. These can include paranoia; increased heart rate; increase in blood pressure; delusional thinking; anger and aggression; tremors, and at higher doses, palpitations and hypothermia.

How long do the effects last?

The effects of meth can last anywhere from three to 12 hours. Users often “do a run” for several days straight in an effort to increase and prolong meth’s perceived positive effects, going without sleep or food.

Effects of withdrawal:

When the feeling of well-being and energy wears off, the meth user may experience entirely opposite effects, because the drug suppresses the normal production of adrenaline in the body. Irritability and fatigue may result. This often leads to the desire to use more in order to remain high.

Adverse reactions:

Many of the effects of meth use can be negative, such as sleeplessness, anger and paranoia. More dramatic reactions include convulsions and agitation. An overdose can result in a potentially fatal cardiac arrest or stroke. There is also a possibility of lead poisoning. Meth abuse during pregnancy can result in congenital deformities and premature delivery.

Effects of prolonged usage:

The pleasure/tension cycle is self-perpetuating. Long-term meth use is devastating. The user is unable to function in daily life and experiences exhaustion when the drug wears off. Dental decay is a well-known result of prolonged use. Long term use and higher doses needed to get high increase the risk of toxicity, overdose and death. Death by overdose rose 125 % between 1998 and 2002. Meth may permanently cause brain damage after prolonged use.

Usage by youth:

The heartbreak of meth’s high incidence of use by teens and young people is exacerbated by the desire by young women to be thin. Meth use crosses every income and social background, and is common at “rave” clubs. The Internet is rife with sites that provide meth recipes and information on where to obtain ingredients. More than .3 % of 12 to 17-year olds and 18 to 25-year olds currently use meth. Among students, methamphetamine use was reported in 2000 to be 1.3 % of eighth grade students, 1.5 % of tenth grade students and 1.5 % of high school seniors. Higher percentages have actually used methamphetamine at some time, including almost 12 % of high school seniors. At least 4% of the U.S. population reports using the drug.

Recent Developments:

Hospital emergency and treatment admissions for meth use increased throughout the 90s. In
the past few years, the use of meth among teens has increased significantly for youth aged 12
to 17. Over the past few years, meth produced in Mexico has also increased.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Amphetamines

What is it?

Several similar drugs are included in this prescription stimulant drug category. Referred to as psychostimulants, they stimulate the central nervous system. Brands such as Benzedrine, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Provigil are used to treat conditions like extreme obesity and narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness). When these drugs are abused, they are often stolen, traded or sold by young people or doctorshopped by adults. The drugs can be come addictive. They are taken to increase energy, alertness, and stamina, and in higher doses, to induce euphoria.

Slang Terms:

Speed, gaggler, pid poppers, Bennies, brown and clears, beans, uppers, pep pills, dexes, black beauties, Louee and “hyper pills.”

How is it used?

Amphetamines are taken in pill form and can be crushed and snorted intranasally or smoked. Provigil (methylphenidate) is mixed with water and injected. The drugs can also be inserted anally or “shafted.”

Signs of usage:

In moderate doses, speech may be rapid and pupils may be dilated. While energetic, the user may become very restless, and there may be signs of irritability, aggressiveness, and loss of appetite. The person may have a panic attack.

Effects of usage:

In low to moderate doses, users experience lots of energy and alertness, sociability, and loss of appetite. The ability to concentrate is enhanced, so students may take “uppers” to cram for a test. At higher doses, users may experience an intense sense of happiness and power. Users build up tolerance to abusive drug use over time, so these highs become harder to achieve at the same dose. Higher doses also elevate blood pressure and heart rate.

How long do the effects last?

Effects of use last 2 to 4 hours, but the half-life (time taken to lose half of the amount of the drug from the system through natural biological activity) of these drugs can last 24 hours.

Effects of withdrawal:

When the amphetamine abuser starts to “come down,” the symptoms range widely but may include radical mood swings, hunger, anxiety, depression, and total exhaustion. Sleep may be interrupted by nightmares. To avoid withdrawal, some users re-dose for a several-day high, or take sedatives and other drugs.

Adverse reactions:

After the initial energetic high, users may feel irritable and extremely restless or anxious, hostile, violent, or aggressive. The long half-life of the drug makes it difficult to sleep even the night after using. High doses may result in headaches, stomach cramping, loss of coordination, and trouble breathing. Injecting the drug is dangerous because it travels quickly to the brain, and other materials may be present in the drug. Overdosing may result in stroke, seizures, high body temperatures, and heart failure.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Abuse over time can result in psychotic tendencies with paranoia or hallucinations, aggressive and violent behavior, insomnia, restlessness, tremors, and weight loss. Serious physical risks of long-term abuse include lung, liver, kidney and heart damage, erectile dysfunction, and an impaired immune system. There is also some evidence of memory loss and impaired thinking.

Usage by youth:

Young people who abuse amphetamines often get them from students who have been prescribed the drugs for ADHD. In 1999, more than half of emergency room admissions for abuse of methylphenidate (including Ritalin) were youths aged ten through 17. The Monitoring the Future Study in 1999 reported 3 percent of high school seniors had used this drug for non-medical reasons in the past year.

Recent Developments:

Use of amphetamines by students and professional athletes still occurs. It was only in 2006 that Major League Baseball banned the substance, but consequences are less severe than using steroids.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Ecstasy/MDMA

What is it?

Ecstasy, or MDMA, is a 3-4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine, which is both a stimulant and a hallucinogenic or psychedelic drug. Ecstasy is a notorious rave and club drug that produces an intense high, unbounded energy, and usually, feelings of happiness. It also increases sensory and sexual pleasure. MDMA is a white powder that is pressed into pastel-colored pills with names like Playboy, bunnies, Nike swoosh, and love, or stamped with smiley faces. MDMA can be addictive and is physically, emotionally, and mentally dangerous.

Slang Terms:

Disco biscuits, E, X, XTC, Adam, hug, beans, love drug, clarity

How is it used?

MDMA can be taken in pill form or dissolved in liquid and swallowed. It is often hidden in candy containers. It is sometimes combined with other drugs, such as ephedrine or heroin. The pills may also contain dangerous additive chemicals. Other drugs, such as the MDMA parent drug MDA (methylenedioxyamphetamine) may actually be sold as ecstasy and can be fatal. The experience of using is called a roll or trip.

Signs of usage:

While on a roll or trip, the user is disassociated with reality, including time and perception. After a trip, there may be severe anxiety, depression, loss of appetite, sleeplessness, and lasting hallucinations.

Effects of usage:

Psychological effects include a feeling of intense pleasure in tactile and sensory perceptions. Sexual pleasure is elevated. An enhanced sense of self-confidence is usually accompanied by very high energy. Users feel they can dance all night. MDMA affects the brain chemical serotonin, which is a messenger to other neurons. The serotonin system plays a vital role in the regulation of moods, aggression, sexual activity, sleep, and pain. When the drug is taken, serotonin is delivered in a huge, “wow” rush. Teeth clenching and grinding as well as jaw tension is common. To prevent this, users often use infant pacifiers. In higher doses, the drug raises the body’s core temperature. At club parties there is often a cooled “chill-out” room for this reason. Users often become dehydrated. Increased heart rate and blood pressure also can result from use.

How long do the effects last?

The effects of MDMA can last 4 to 6 hours, with a gradual withdrawal of up to 5 hours.

Effects of withdrawal:

A disconnection with reality may last much longer than 4 to 6 hours. Because MDMA is a stimulant, withdrawal brings feelings of anxiety, and can cause depression, trouble concentrating, nausea, confusion, involuntary jaw clenching, and erratic sleep. At least 60 percent of users have been reported to experience withdrawal symptoms such as these, and symptoms can last weeks.

Adverse reactions:

Besides extreme levels of anxiety, fatigue, and depression, there are dangerous physical risks associated with MDMA. Severe dehydration can occur with extended physical activity while taking MDMA, as well as hyperthermia, when the body temperature rises dramatically. This can actually lead to heatstroke, kidney, liver and cardiovascular failure, and death. Fatalities can also result when taken with other drugs, including prescription antidepressants. In the past few years, there have been cases of users being unable to disengage from the psychotic state induced by the drug. Users are also at high risk for sexual assault.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Memory and cognitive loss has been shown to result from prolonged use. Health problems include liver and kidney damage. Long-term users exhibit behavioral and emotional problems, and may lose interest in everyday life and school.

Usage by youth:

MDMA is primarily used by young people in social settings, such as underground rave, club, or dance parties. The use of hallucinogens as a class is most prevalent among those aged 18 to 25 (1.8 percent of the population). Four percent of eighth graders have used hallucinogens; 7.8 percent of tenth graders and 1.8 percent of high school seniors have tried them.

Recent Developments:

Unfortunately, many young people believe MDMA is a safe club drug. The parties are broadly advertised and promotions even insinuate that X or E will be available. In the last few years, the distribution of the drug has moved into homes and other communitywide settings, including large parties in private homes. The Community Epidemiology Group reports increased usage among African-American and Hispanic groups. So-called club drugs are also available on the Internet, along with advice from drug dealers on how to “safely” take the drugs.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Phencyclidine (PCP)

What is it?

Phencyclidine or PCP is an illegally produced hallucinogen that began as a surgical anesthetic in the 1950’s but was removed from the market in 1965 because patients suffered hallucinations and delirium while recuperating. PCP is also used as a veterinary drug and is sometimes diverted from that use as a human recreational drug. PCP is a “disassociate” drug because it distorts perceptions of sight and sound and produces a feeling of detachment from a person’s surroundings and self. It is also a sedative-hypnotic. The drug is a white crystalline powder that is soluble in water or alcohol. When contaminated, it can appear tan to yellow-brown. Concentrations of the drug vary due to difficulty of street preparation and other toxic chemicals can be present.

Slang Terms:

Angel dust, wack, ozone, rocket fuel, hog, fry, formaldehyde, amp, wet, elephant, tranq, TicTac and embalming fluid. Crystal super grass refers to PCP mixed with marijuana.

How is it used?

Lighter doses of up to 10 mg are usually smoked, snorted nasally or injected, while larger does are usually taken orally. PCP can also be added to eye drops and is often used with alcohol or with other drugs, including marijuana, crack cocaine or cocaine.

Signs of usage:

Speech is often garbled, sparse, or disjointed, eyes flick up and down, and users have trouble moving around and walking normally. They also have trouble with eye-hand coordination and may drool, sweat profusely, and appear flushed. Under the influence of PCP people can become very combative. They drive erratically and are likely to have an accident. With prolonged use, weight loss and depression can occur. High doses cause schizophrenia–like symptoms such as delusions, or conversely, a catatonic state in which the user’s eyes are glassy and he is conscious but doesn’t react.

Effects of usage:

The psychological effects of PCP use can be either exhilarating or frightening and always dangerous, so many first time users won’t use it again. However, with a high, continued drug use becomes addictive. Addictive highs of PCP include a perception of great physical strength, being invulnerable and impervious to pain, as well as experiencing hallucinations, which are sought out by some users.

How long do the effects last?

PCP’s effects develop within about an hour, depending on the how the drug is taken, and can last up to eight hours, with gradually diminishing effects over a 4 to 6 hour period. Slowed memory and physical reaction time can last up to 14 hours.

Effects of withdrawal:

Long after a continual user has taken PCP, there can be psychotic episodes, memory loss and loss of muscle coordination. Even with one use, the memory of being temporarily out of control of one’s muscles and the sensation of hallucinations can be frightening. Flashbacks often occur.

Adverse reactions:

PCP is an extremely dangerous drug, and is unique among hallucinogenic drugs in that it can result in a fatal overdose, usually resulting in cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest or stroke. Seizures and coma can also result from overdose. Users may become destructive to themselves and others, and become hysterical or even suicidal. Use of PCP can also result in dizziness, blurred vision, drowsiness, numbness of feet and hands, catatonic state, and more extreme reactions such as schizophrenia-like hallucinations and paranoia.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Memory loss and difficulties with speech and thinking, depression, weight loss and liver function abnormalities may occur after prolonged use. Psychotic effects that mimic schizophrenia can actually last up to a month or longer, and flashbacks of a negative trip can occur throughout life.

Usage by youth:

Annual use of PCP was reported as 1.3 % of seniors. Specific use of PCP by younger students is unavailable. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that while use among those aged 18 to 25 declined, use among 12 to 13 year olds was up significantly in 2004, from 0.1 % in 2003 to 0.3 %.

Recent Developments:

Hospital emergency room admissions for youth using PCP have increased steadily in the past few years. Some of this may be due to the fact that youth are increasingly using PCP and PCP/formaldehyde/marijuana mixtures.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Tricyclic Antidepressants

What is it?

Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are prescription drugs used specifically to treat depression and chronic pain. TCAs are not considered addictive.

How is it used?

TCAs are available in tablet and liquid forms to be taken orally and also in a liquid to be given intravenously.

Sign of usage:

Drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, dizziness, increased appetite and weight gain are all signs of TCA usage.

Effects of withdrawal:

TCAs aren’t addictive, however, stopping treatment abruptly or missing several doses can cause withdrawal-like symptoms such as: nausea, headache, dizziness, lethargy and flu-like symptoms.

Adverse reactions:

TCAs may cause some people to be agitated, irritable or display other abnormal behaviors. They may cause suicidal thoughts and tendencies to become more depressed. Use of TCAs may also cause the skin to be more sensitive to sunlight, producing a rash, itching, and severe sunburn. TCA overdose can result in severe central nervous system depression. Overdose of TCA is the most common cause of death from a prescription drug.

Usage by youth:

Prescription drug abuse is on the rise with use due to the widespread availability of the drugs. While TCA is not considered addictive, improper dosage and combinations with alcohol or other drugs may prove fatal.

Recent Developments:

Combining TCAs and opiates can achieve a prolonged feeling of euphoria and pleasant visual and auditory hallucinations. TCAs are widely available through the internet, by prescription, and by stealing them from medicine cabinets.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Barbiturates

What is it?

Barbiturates belong to a class of prescription hypnotic-sedative depressants that affect the central nervous system. They have widely been replaced by different drugs because they are dangerous in higher doses and can be both physically and psychologically addictive. However, they still are used commonly to treat forms of epilepsy. Commonly-abused barbiturates include amobarbital (Amytal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), and secobarbital (Seconal).

Slang Terms:

Barbs, birds, blockbusters, Christmas trees, goof balls, pinks, red devils, reds and blues, yellow jackets.

How is it used?

Barbiturates are usually swallowed in pill form or liquid gel pill form, crushed as a powder and added to liquid, injected, or used as a suppository. Drug abusers use barbiturates to get high, or after using stimulants, to “come down.” The drugs are also used in combination with alcohol, which multiplies their effects and can be life threatening.

Signs of usage:

When high on the drugs, the user may experience slurred speech, sluggishness, shallow breathing, fatigue, disorientation, and dilated pupils. The drugs often cause drunk-like behavior as the user experiences mild euphoria. Breathing disorders, general chronic tiredness, physical coordination problems, and menstrual irregularities are signs of prolonged use.

Effects of usage:

Used as a drug of abuse, barbiturates may cause a person to feel euphoric and relaxed and act with poor judgment. He or she may experience slurred speech and an awkward gait when walking. The calming effect of the drugs is why barbiturates are often used to counteract the anxiety and other negative sensations felt when withdrawing from stimulant drugs such as cocaine and amphetamines. Sluggishness and sedation also occurs at higher doses, as well as fever, dizziness, and respiratory depression. Overdose with barbiturates or use with alcohol can be deadly.

How long do the effects last?

The effects of barbiturates can last from 4 to 16 hours or longer. Symptoms of use may gradually fade over the week after use, depending on the dose. Use over a period of time usually builds up tolerance to the drugs, so users must take larger doses to get the same effects. When users take the drug daily for more than a month, usually beyond the therapeutic dose, the brain easily develops a need for the drug. When a user is psychologically addicted to the drugs, finding and using the drug becomes the focus of life.

Effects of withdrawal:

Effects of withdrawal or abstinence include shallow breathing, tremors, insomnia, and agitation, and can escalate to high temperature and hallucinations. Barbiturate withdrawal can be more dangerous than heroin withdrawal at high doses. Life threatening respiratory depression can occur with withdrawal. When regular users abruptly stop taking the drugs at high doses, they may develop symptoms from insomnia to restlessness and anxiety to convulsions and death.

Adverse reactions:

Respiratory depression can lead to death. In fact, barbiturate overdose is a factor in nearly one third of all reported drug-related deaths, because accidental overdose may be very close to what is considered a safe dose. Barbiturates are also commonly implicated in suicides. When barbiturates are used as a club drug, the user becomes vulnerable to assault or sexual assault.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Physical and psychological addiction can develop rapidly with these drugs. If taken as an antidote to stimulant drugs, the vicious cycle is hard to break. Chronic breathing problems, slowed reflexes, continual inebriation, and sexual dysfunction are also risks of prolonged use. All withdrawal symptoms noted remain serious risks with prolonged use. Abstinence can result in dangerous symptoms and must be medically supervised.

Usage by youth:

Even though barbiturates were mainly drugs of abuse during the ‘60s and ‘70s, there has been a moderate resurgence of use of barbiturates by youths during the last ten years. This is in part because of the popularity of stimulant drugs and the use of barbiturates to calm agitation during withdrawal. Because barbiturates have a longer duration of effects, they are not the most popular drugs. In 2001, 2.8 percent of high school seniors reported use of barbiturates. Barbiturates, GHB (gamma hydroxybutyerate), and benzodiazepines are all used in the club and rave drug scene. Often users in these settings do not know that barbiturates and other sedativehypnotics have been added to a drink.

Recent Developments:

Club drugs are very dangerous and include the use of debilitating sedative hypnotics like barbiturates. So-called club drugs are also available on the Internet.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Benzodiazepines

What is it?

This family of depressants affects the central nervous system and is widely prescribed for the treatment of insomnia, anxiety, and prevention of seizures and muscle spasms. Most patients use it as prescribed, but adolescents and young people who abuse these drugs are seeking a “high.” Physical dependence can be caused by high dose or long-term use. The drug is also doctor-shopped by adult users. Drug abusers often use benzodiazepines to “come down,” or ease withdrawal from a stimulant drug, such as methamphetamine. High doses of these drugs, with alcohol alone or other depressants, can cause death. A benzodiazepine that is illegally marketed in the U.S., flunitrazepam (rohypnol) is a dangerous, long acting “club drug,” that can be mixed in a victim’s drink. This has notoriously resulted in sexual assault. Common prescription benzodiazepines include the trade names Valium, Xanax, Librium, and Ativan.

Slang Terms:

Rohypnol may be called rophies, roofies, and roach. Others slang terms include benzos, downers, tranks.

How is it used?

These drugs are most commonly taken in pill form, but can be used in powder form and mixed in water or drinks. They are sometimes taken in combination with other drugs or alcohol. They are also used by abusers with GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate) and similar drugs that are marketed as nutritional supplements.

Signs of usage:

Those who take rohypnol are in a near trance-like state or appear drunk, even with hangover like effects in withdrawal. Those who take high doses of other benzodiazepines may appear drunk or uninhibited.

Effects of usage:

In prescription form, benzodiazepines are therapeutic, but long-term use can cause addiction. Used to get a high or induce a drunken-like state, the drugs lessen inhibitions and impair judgment. Rohypnol causes a stupor-like state.

How long do the effects last?

The effects of rohypnol are fast-acting and can last 4 to 8 hours. Short-acting benzodiazepines have a half-life of less than 12 hours. Intermediate-acting compounds have a half-life of 12-24 hours, and may cause inattention or sluggishness the morning after taking.

Effects of withdrawal:

Withdrawal symptoms are mainly anxiety-related. These effects occasionally go on for months, and may include insomnia and gastrointestinal problems, even when use is gradually reduced. Abrupt discontinuation of prescription benzodiazepines can cause these symptoms as well as seizures and hyperactivity.

Adverse reactions:

Rohypnol causes sedation and sluggishness and can also cause amnesia, resulting in a person not remembering what happens during the drug-induced stupor. Users are at a high risk for sexual assault. The effects of benzodiazapine may linger for hours, causing inattention to tasks, such as driving. For some users, the use of benzodiazepines can cause high anxiety and irritability instead of the intended sedation. At high doses, and/or with other drugs, benzodiazepines can be deadly.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Even when used therapeutically, benzodiazepines can cause decreased attention span when used for more than a year. Physical addiction can occur with abuse or even prolonged therapeutic use.

Usage by youth:

Rohypnol is characteristically a “club” drug taken by young people. It is hard to determine the use of this drug as a date rape or club-rape drug because often the victim has no memory of the assault. When adolescents abuse prescription benzodiazepines, they take higher doses for a kind of drunken high.

Recent Developments:

The use of rohypnol as a “club” drug is so dangerous that the manufacturer and U.S. agencies have been working to reduce its availability in this country. However, rohypnol and other socalled “club” drugs are currently available on the Internet. Young people are also taking the drug in combination with growth hormones and GHB in cleaning solvents.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics , LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Methadone

What is it?

Methadone is a prescription narcotic used in the treatment of opiate addiction. Methadone blocks the euphoric effects of heroin, reduces craving and suppresses withdrawal effects for more than 24 hours. Methadone is sometimes diverted from its legitimate use, sold on the illegal market, and used as a drug of abuse.

Slang Terms:

Juice, green, amidone, chocolate chip cookies (methadone or heroin combined with MDMA), fizzies, street methadone and wafer.

How is it used?

Methadone is available as a tablet, as an oral solution, or as an injectible liquid.

Side Effects of usage:

Side effects of methadone are sweating, sedation, constipation, and weight gain. After regular usage these side effects usually disappear.

How long do the effects last?

Methadone is typically administered on a daily basis under the supervision of a Methadone Clinic and its effects last for 24-36 hours. However, individuals are now abusing Methadone rather then using it as a means of recovery from Heroin.

Effects of withdrawal:

When a dependent user stops taking the drug they may experience withdrawal symptoms including muscle tremors, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, sweating, and runny nose.

Adverse reactions:

Individuals who abuse methadone risk becoming tolerant of and physically dependent on the drug. Methadone does not produce the euphoric rush associated with other narcotics so there is the potential for users to consume dangerously large quantities of methadone in a vain attempt to attain the desired narcotic rush. Methadone overdoses are associated with severe respiratory depressions, decreases in heart rate and blood pressure, coma, and death.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Methadone has been proven to be clinically safe when prescribed and administered under medical supervision.

Usage by youth:

Nearly 1% of high school seniors in the U.S. reported abusing methadone at least once in their lifetime.

Recent Developments:

The increasing availability of illegal methadone has created new experimentation with the drug. Most common is combining methadone with other drugs such as ecstasy.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

Oxycodone

What is it?

Oxycodone is a prescription narcotic in the opiate class of drugs that is used medically for pain relief.

Slang Terms:

Hillbilly heroin, oxycotton, oxy, OC, killers

How is it used?

The drug can be ingested, snorted, injected, or smoked.

Sign of usage:

The user displays droopy eyelids, constricted pupils and sluggish, delayed speech and mannerisms. The opiate user will appear very drowsy and have difficulty with mental functioning and attention span. If the user administers the drug with an injection, there will be needle marks and possible signs of infection at injection sites.

Effects of usage:

Oxycodone produces an initial euphoric effect. It can also produce drowsiness, lowered blood pressure, lowered body temperature, nausea, slowed breathing, decreased pulse rate, and constipation.

How long do the effects last?

Length of effects varies depending on dosage. OxyContin (continuous release form) has an eight to twelve hour duration of action.

Effects of withdrawal:

Withdrawal, which in regular abusers may occur as early as a few hours after the last dose, produces drug craving, restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, hot/cold flushing with goose bumps, and muscle cramps. Major withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 and 72 hours after the last dose and subside after about a week.

Adverse reactions:

Overdose of oxycodone can result in respiratory arrest and death. For those users with already compromised physical health, respiratory complications can result due to the drug’s depressing effects on respiration.

Effects of prolonged usage:

Long-term use of oxycodone can lead to physical dependence and addiction.

Usage by youth:

Youths were more likely than older adults to have misused oxycodone (1 percent among youths aged 12 to 17 versus 0.7 percent among adults aged 26 or older). 15.4 percent of high school seniors reported non-medical use of at least one prescription medication within the past year.

Recent Developments:

High levels of availability (because oxycodone can be found in medicine cabinets, on the internet, and through physicians) contribute to a steady increase in abuse. Combining oxycodone with other drugs (including alcohol) as well as crushing the slow release formula of oxycodone and injecting or snorting the powder create high risks for addiction and overdose.

Information provided by Dr. Barbara A. Krantz, Chief Medical Officer at the Hanley Center

First Check Diagnostics, LLC is offering these resources for informational purposes only, and the Hanley Center is no way affiliated with any of the entities that provide the resources.

welcome

Introduction

Introduction to the First Check Home Drug Testing video series.

using-the-test

Using The Test

Instructional video explaining how to use a First Check Home Drug Test.

interpreting-test-results

Interpreting Test Results

Instructional video explaining how to read the results of a First Check Home Drug Test.

help-and-support-resources

Help & Support

Instructional video discussing home drug testing for parents, and help and support resources if a positive test result is received.

free-confirmatory-testing

Confirmation Testing

Instructional video explaining the process for sending a First Check Home Drug Test for confirmatory laboratory testing, and retrieving confirmatory test results.

First Check Home Drug Test Accuracy

First Check is dedicated to producing high-quality, technologically-advanced products that provide you with the most accurate results possible.

Our clinical studies and the expertise of our experienced team of researchers, chemists, and toxicologists allow First Check to introduce products that let people quickly and accurately assess aspects of their health.

Many First Check® Home Drug testing products are more than 99 percent accurate.

First Check will continue to develop innovative home test products you can trust to provide fast, accurate results in the privacy of your home.

First Check Home Test products offer:

  • Superior-quality testing device
  • Safe, hygienic testing
  • The opportunity to send home tests to the lab for confirmatory testing
  1. How do I ship the sample to the lab?
  2. Are First Check Home Drug Tests CLIA waived?
  3. If I send a urine sample to the laboratory for confirmatory testing, do I need to give my name, address and telephone number?
  4. If I test negative with a First Check Home Drug Test, does this guarantee I will test negative on other drug tests administered by a professional?
  5. Is a white line considered a Preliminary Positive Result?
  6. What cut-off levels do First Check Home Drug Tests use for detecting drugs in urine?
  7. How soon after taking a drug can you detect it in urine with a First Check Home Drug Test and how long can a drug be detected in urine?
  8. Why don’t First Check Home Drug Tests use “zero” as the cut-off level for detecting drugs in urine?
  9. Are there any factors that can affect the test result?
  10. When is the best time to take the test?
  11. How soon can I read my results?
  12. How do I know if the First Check Home Drug Test worked properly? What if I am unsure of the result?
  13. What is meant by a Preliminary Positive Result?
  14. The Drug Line is lighter than the Control Line. Does this mean some drug is present?
  15. How accurate are First Check® Home Drug Tests?

1 - How do I ship the sample to the lab?

  • Step 1: Attach Identification Label
    • Attach Identification Label to the Collection Cup and place check mark in the box for the drug(s) that gave a Preliminary Positive Result.
    • Attach the lower portion of the Identification Label to the designated location on the insert and store in a safe place.
    • Important: Without this Identification Label, we will be unable to test your sample and you will need this number to retrieve your results.
  • Step 2: Place Test in Box
    • Make sure the Test Lid is securely fastened to the Collection Cup then place it in the Plastic Transportation Bag.
    • Seal bag and place into the Pre-Addressed Mailing Box.
  • Step 3: Ship Sample
    • Close Pre-Addressed Mailing Box and secure with packing tape.
    • Samples should be mailed within 24 hours of collection.

Important: The mailing box is not pre-paid. To ensure prompt delivery, be sure to pay the mail service the appropriate shipping charges. For shipping costs, visit these resources:
UPS website
Fedex website
United States Postal Service website

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2 - Are First Check Home Drug Tests CLIA waived?

For more information on CLIA, please refer to the FDA website.

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3 - If I send a urine sample to the laboratory for confirmatory testing, do I need to give my name, address and telephone number?

  • No, it is not necessary to include your name, address or phone number with your sample.
  • Samples are run using the anonymous Identification Number included on the Identification Label in the test kit and all testing in our laboratory is strictly confidential. You will need this Identification Number to retrieve results, so keep it in a safe place. If you include your name or return address on the shipping label, this information will not be documented in any fashion.
  • For more information on shipping your sample to our laboratory for confidential confirmatory testing see below.

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4 - If I test negative with a First Check Home Drug Test, does this guarantee I will test negative on other drug tests administered by a professional?

Many First Check® Home Drug testing products are more than 99 percent accurate in detecting specific drugs according to the designated cut-off levels. However, if a more sensitive test is administered, there is a chance of testing positive if drugs are present in urine.

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5 - Is a white line considered a Preliminary Positive Result?

  • Yes. A white waxy looking line in the Drug Window (sometimes referred to as a “ghost line”) is considered a Preliminary Positive Result and should be sent into the lab for confirmatory testing.
  • A Negative Result can only be based on the appearance of a red or pink colored line in the Drug Window. Even if the line in the Drug Window is very faint, as long as there is some red or pink color to it, it is considered a Negative Result and should not be sent to the lab for confirmatory testing.

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6 - What cut-off levels do First Check Home Drug Tests use for detecting drugs in urine?

  • The cut-off level for each drug varies (depending on the type of drug) and is measured in nanograms (ng/ml).
  •  Although First Check Home Drug Tests are designed to detect a very small amount of a drug in urine, if the amount is below the established cut-off level, you may test negative for that drug even though you may have taken the drug.

Drug Detection Time in Urine

Drug/Identifier Cut-off Level† Minimum Maximum
Marijuana (THC) 50 ng/ml 2 hours Up to 40+ days
Cocaine (COC) 300 ng/ml 1-4 hours 2-4 days
Methamphetamine (MET) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Amphetamines (AMP) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Ecstasy (MDMA) 500 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Opiates (heroin) (OPI) 2000 ng/ml 2 hours 2-3 days
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25 ng/ml 4-6 hours 7-14 days
Benzodiazepines (BZO) 300 ng/ml 2-7 hours 1-4 days
Methadone (MTD) 300 ng/ml 3-8 hours 1-3 days
Barbiturates (BAR) 300 ng/ml 2-4 hours 1-3 weeks
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA) 1000 ng/ml 8-12 hours 2-7 days
Oxycodone (OXY) 100 ng/ml 1-3 hours 1-2 days

† The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA), has set “cut-off” levels when testing for marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamines, ecstasy, opiates, and PCP. First Check is manufactured to conform to those standards. Screening tests may not detect amounts of drugs in a urine sample that are below the cut-off level. Even though some level of drug may be present in a urine sample, the sample would still be considered Negative Result if the drug level is below the cut-off level.

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7 - How soon after taking a drug can you detect it in urine with a First Check Home Drug Test and how long can a drug be detected in urine?

  • Most drugs can be detected in urine with a First Check Home Drug Test within a few hours after taking the drug; however this can vary depending on the type of drug taken, the amount taken, the frequency of use, and the metabolism of the person being tested.
  • Each drug is cleared by the body at different rates. Some drugs, for example marijuana, can stay in the body for up to several weeks after use.

Drug Detection Time in Urine

Drug/Identifier Cut-off Level† Minimum Maximum
Marijuana (THC) 50 ng/ml 2 hours Up to 40+ days
Cocaine (COC) 300 ng/ml 1-4 hours 2-4 days
Methamphetamine (MET) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Amphetamines (AMP) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Ecstasy (MDMA) 500 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Opiates (heroin) (OPI) 2000 ng/ml 2 hours 2-3 days
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25 ng/ml 4-6 hours 7-14 days
Benzodiazepines (BZO) 300 ng/ml 2-7 hours 1-4 days
Methadone (MTD) 300 ng/ml 3-8 hours 1-3 days
Barbiturates (BAR) 300 ng/ml 2-4 hours 1-3 weeks
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA) 1000 ng/ml 8-12 hours 2-7 days
Oxycodone (OXY) 100 ng/ml 1-3 hours 1-2 days

† The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA), has set “cut-off” levels when testing for marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamines, ecstasy, opiates, and PCP. First Check is manufactured to conform to those standards. Screening tests may not detect amounts of drugs in a urine sample that are below the cut-off level. Even though some level of drug may be present in a urine sample, the sample would still be considered Negative Result if the drug level is below the cut-off level.

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8 - Why don’t First Check Home Drug Tests use “zero” as the cut-off level for detecting drugs in urine?

First Check uses standard cut-off levels to help to reduce the likelihood of false-positive screening results which can occur when using a zero cut-off level.

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9 - Are there any factors that can affect the test result?

  • Certain over-the-counter medications or prescription drugs may cross-react with the First Check Home Drug Test and cause a Preliminary Positive Result.
  • The test will only give accurate results on fresh human urine samples. Old or diluted urine samples may not be suitable for testing.
  • If you are testing someone else, keep in mind that First Check Home Drug Tests are only as accurate as the urine sample being tested. Samples can easily be “adulterated” (i.e., contaminated or tampered) with common household products such as bleach and other liquids if you’re not closely supervising the entire process.
  • This test provides a screening result only. It is not designed to determine the actual concentration of a drug, the level of intoxication nor is it to be used for legal purposes.

Drug Detection Time in Urine

Drug/Identifier Cut-off Level† Minimum Maximum
Marijuana (THC) 50 ng/ml 2 hours Up to 40+ days
Cocaine (COC) 300 ng/ml 1-4 hours 2-4 days
Methamphetamine (MET) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Amphetamines (AMP) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Ecstasy (MDMA) 500 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Opiates (heroin) (OPI) 2000 ng/ml 2 hours 2-3 days
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25 ng/ml 4-6 hours 7-14 days
Benzodiazepines (BZO) 300 ng/ml 2-7 hours 1-4 days
Methadone (MTD) 300 ng/ml 3-8 hours 1-3 days
Barbiturates (BAR) 300 ng/ml 2-4 hours 1-3 weeks
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA) 1000 ng/ml 8-12 hours 2-7 days
Oxycodone (OXY) 100 ng/ml 1-3 hours 1-2 days

† The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA), has set “cut-off” levels when testing for marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamines, ecstasy, opiates, and PCP. First Check is manufactured to conform to those standards. Screening tests may not detect amounts of drugs in a urine sample that are below the cut-off level. Even though some level of drug may be present in a urine sample, the sample would still be considered Negative Result if the drug level is below the cut-off level.

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10 - When is the best time to take the test?

  • Use first morning urine when possible as this urine tends to be the most concentrated urine of the day making it best for detecting any drugs that may be in the system.
  • However, First Check Home Drug Tests can be used any time of day.

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11 - How soon can I read my results?

  • You can read your results after 5 minutes as long as a red or pink colored line has appeared next to the word Control or the letter C.
  • Disregard all results after 10 minutes.

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12 - How do I know if the First Check Home Drug Test worked properly? What if I am unsure of the result?

  • The test is working properly as long as a red or pink colored line appears next to the word Control or the letter C (depending on the test you have purchased).
  •  The result is Negative when a red or pink colored line appears next to the word Drug or the drug abbreviation (depending on the test you have purchased).
  • The result is Preliminary Positive when NO line appears next to the word Drug or the drug abbreviation (depending on the test you have purchased).
  • If you have questions about your results call 1-888-788-5716 to speak with one of our First Check representatives.
  • If you are unsure about your results please re-test using a new First Check Home Drug Test.

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13 - What is meant by a Preliminary Positive Result?

The First Check Home Drug Test is considered a “screening test.” We recommend all Preliminary Positive Results be sent to the laboratory for free confidential confirmatory testing. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is considered the gold standard in laboratory testing for most drugs.

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14 - The Drug Line is lighter than the Control Line. Does this mean some drug is present?

No. Any line next to the word Drug or the drug abbreviation (depending on the test you have purchased), no matter how dark or light, is considered a Negative Result and no further testing is required. It is possible that the intensity of the lines will vary among the drugs being tested for due to a variety of reasons such as; how diluted the urine is, the pH or protein level of the urine, or interference from a metabolite in the urine that closely resembles the drug.

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15 - How accurate are First Check® Home Drug Tests?

Many First Check® Home Drug testing products are more than 99 percent accurate in detecting specific drugs in urine. The accuracy of the test depends on several factors such as how close to the cut-off level the drug is in your urine, how soon the test was administered after ingesting a drug, and how much of the drug was used or ingested.

Drug Detection Time in Urine

Drug/Identifier Cut-off Level† Minimum Maximum
Marijuana (THC) 50 ng/ml 2 hours Up to 40+ days
Cocaine (COC) 300 ng/ml 1-4 hours 2-4 days
Methamphetamine (MET) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Amphetamines (AMP) 1000 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Ecstasy (MDMA) 500 ng/ml 2-7 hours 2-4 days
Opiates (heroin) (OPI) 2000 ng/ml 2 hours 2-3 days
Phencyclidine (PCP) 25 ng/ml 4-6 hours 7-14 days
Benzodiazepines (BZO) 300 ng/ml 2-7 hours 1-4 days
Methadone (MTD) 300 ng/ml 3-8 hours 1-3 days
Barbiturates (BAR) 300 ng/ml 2-4 hours 1-3 weeks
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA) 1000 ng/ml 8-12 hours 2-7 days
Oxycodone (OXY) 100 ng/ml 1-3 hours 1-2 days

† The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA), has set “cut-off” levels when testing for marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamines, ecstasy, opiates, and PCP. First Check is manufactured to conform to those standards. Screening tests may not detect amounts of drugs in a urine sample that are below the cut-off level. Even though some level of drug may be present in a urine sample, the sample would still be considered Negative Result if the drug level is below the cut-off level.

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